Great Southern Compassionate Communities

Compassionate Communities is an international public health palliative approach whose aim is to engage broad community support for people approaching the end of their lives. The movement takes initiatives that encourage and enable the whole community to provide care and support to complement those given by health and social service providers.

The Great Southern Compassionate Communities project aims to make our community more knowledgeable about matters to do with death, dying and bereavement; and the care of those affected. Also, to improve access to a broader range of safe and good quality care that will result from this initiative.

A major task for the project will be to influence community attitudes about the end-of-life, and some of the practical issues (such as care) that arise. This will involve thinking and talking about things such as:-

  • Accepting that death, dying and loss are normal/natural
  • Thinking through future treatment and care needs
  • Making an Advance Care Plan to help family, friends, carers and health professionals understand how you would like to be cared for now and in the future.
  • What practical support might be needed to enable terminally ill people to die at home, and how to support family, friends and carers through periods of caring and eventual death.
  • Encouraging broader and shared community support during periods of caring and grief.

The target communities for the project over the two years are:

  • City of Albany (regional centre and major focus of the project initially)
  • Shire of Denmark
  • Shire of Plantagenet
  • Shire of Katanning


Compassionate Communities is an international public health palliative approach whose aim is to engage broad community support for people approaching the end of their lives. The movement takes initiatives that encourage and enable the whole community to provide care and support to complement those given by health and social service providers.

The Great Southern Compassionate Communities project aims to make our community more knowledgeable about matters to do with death, dying and bereavement; and the care of those affected. Also, to improve access to a broader range of safe and good quality care that will result from this initiative.

A major task for the project will be to influence community attitudes about the end-of-life, and some of the practical issues (such as care) that arise. This will involve thinking and talking about things such as:-

  • Accepting that death, dying and loss are normal/natural
  • Thinking through future treatment and care needs
  • Making an Advance Care Plan to help family, friends, carers and health professionals understand how you would like to be cared for now and in the future.
  • What practical support might be needed to enable terminally ill people to die at home, and how to support family, friends and carers through periods of caring and eventual death.
  • Encouraging broader and shared community support during periods of caring and grief.

The target communities for the project over the two years are:

  • City of Albany (regional centre and major focus of the project initially)
  • Shire of Denmark
  • Shire of Plantagenet
  • Shire of Katanning


Great Southern Compassionate Communities Project.

Have you had any involvement in this project? Have you attended any of our events, taken part in a survey or downloaded information from the online toolkit? Have you attended a Death Cafe or taken part in the Albany Community Hospice's Weavers Project? 

Has your approach to, understanding of, or experience with death, dying and loss changed or been impacted by your involvement?

If so we'd love to hear your stories.  

Please feel free to share your stories on this site.



Thank you for submitting your story. 

It's really appreciated.

Many thanks

The Compassionate Communities Team 

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  • In Memory of Ordinary Things

    about 2 months ago

    A short video giving a beautiful insight into the “In Memory of Ordinary Things” community arts project that was run during August 2019 by Albany’s Dying to Know Day Committee. This is just one of the community partners that WAPHA’s Great Southern Compassionate Communities team is working with as part of its work on the “Greater Choice for At Home Palliative Care” measure. Take a moment to consider these poignant and generously shared memories and think about what death and dying (the “D” words) means to you and your family.

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